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Staff Reviews for La Herencia Cubana

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La Herencia Cubana

Posted by Jeff K

I burn a lot of cigars, so I’m always looking for something inexpensive, but enjoyable. I don’t mind spending $7-10 bucks on a cigar I like, but if I can find something good for less- bring it on. The eternal quest may just have ended. I discovered La Herencia Cubana, like an oasis in the desert, just at the right time. With SCHIP quickly approaching, most of the cigars are going to go up a minimum of 40 cents a pop (the sad part is that many are going up much more drastically). So a cigar that was 5 bucks a stick could realistically become 6 dollars or even more in many cases. La Herencia Cubana is currently between $2.50 and $3.00 a stick- so realistically it may go up, but only marginally (I hope!). Worst-case scenario 4 bucks a piece, which is still a totally appetizing price.

Forget the previous- that this cigar retails for less than $3. If I handed you one un-banded, I’d be willing to bet a hefty sum that you like it and would be willing to pay more. I’ve always said if a cigar burns well, draws well, and tastes half decent- it’s worth 4 dollars, right? Sure, there are definitely undervalued cigars out there, even in the $1-2 range, but they usually lack a bit in the flavor department. Therein lays the difference between La Herencia Cubana and others in it price range.

Haven’t heard of La Herencia? Well have you heard of Padilla Habano, ITC 10th Anniversary, Rocky Patel Fusion, or Man O’ War? All top dollar sticks, made side-by-side in the same factory as La Herencia. Same rollers, same quality control, same well-fermented, well- aged tobaccos. 

La Herencia Cubana employs an oily, Sumatra wrapper from Ecuador that’s just loaded with flavor. The balance of long-fillers from different regions of Nicaragua (Jalapa, Condega, and Esteli) along with the wrapper, creates an experience that’s ultimately smooth, but also extremely flavorful and complex. The final piece, which completes this cigar to a degree usually reserved for the pricey sticks, is the aroma. I just savor it. Extremely rich, but with that buttery baked bread smell that’s just so enjoyable, the aroma alone is worth the price of the cigar. The smoke itself is cool, creamy and velvety thick. With notes of cedar, spice, and tobacco- La Herencia imparts a rich, earthy profile that changes constantly and keeps it interesting until the final puff. Medium-full bodied, enjoyable and intensely flavorful.

Honestly, I think I could smoke one everyday. Hell, for that price- twice a day. It’s just good. With about 500 different brands of cigars to pick from- I chose this for my first review. I think that speaks for itself.

La Herencia Cubana

Posted by Keith

Around the CI Campfire a debate has raged as of late - and it ain’t about politics. It’s about an interesting brand called La Herencia Cubana. It's one of those blends that 60% of folks absolutely love, but the rest hate - and not much in-between. It's a product of cigar maker AJ Fernandez, maker of a few Padilla and Rocky Patel lines, plus the exquisite Man O' War blend, among others. Since the day it first hit our catalog a few months back I raved about it because I find it to be a fantastic smoke. I am a cigar geek, 100% certified. "Guilty as charged, your Honor." Indeed, I eat, drink, and breathe cigars....and when a new one comes out, one I feel the CI Faithful will appreciate, I can't help but shout it from the mountaintop. Not just to be able to rub a few nickels together and pay the light bill - which is an added advantage - but mainly to expand the horizons of fellow cigar dudes (that's you). After all, you owe it to yourself to enjoy more than just one type of wine, one beer, one woman (ooops, cancel that one) or one type of food all day.

La Herencia Cubana is a genuine beauty. The wrapper is Ecuadorian Sumatra and is positively sultry, with an oily, slightly toothy, leathery texture and seamless appearance. So pretty - and combined with lovely, if understated, bands - that your expectations inevitably soar upon first glance. And after burning two boxes over the past month, there's no doubt this cigar deserves a few moments of your time. NOTE: it will take you a few sticks to appreciate its subtle nuances; in fact, it will take you at least an inch into the first one before the cigar's flavor really opens up, so be a tad patient. 

Each size is filled to the brim with premium Nicaraguan tobaccos from the country’s three growing regions, promoting a true Nicaraguan character: rich and aromatic. La Herencia's strength is deceiving, largely in part to the aged long-fillers....it's well-balanced, creating subtle and gradual changes throughout the burn. The cigar opens with some peppery notes that fade quickly, but not totally. A creamy core of tobacco and wood soon dominates. Alternativing hints of oak and cedar, oddly enough sometimes both at once. Midway through there’s a slight touch of coffee bean, just before the cigar really stretches its legs and becomes fuller in character

I understand all palates are different and not every enthusiast will fall in love with this cigar. I love it and therefore urge you to give it a shot. Considering our convenient return policy, it’s worth it and then some. Join the debate, men!

La Herencia Cubana

Posted by Steve R

If you read Keith’s review on this cigar, you understand the debate behind it. If not, it seems to be a love or hate blend. While most of our customers enjoy it, some do not....and our retail store has been marked as a meeting grounds for their (seemingly) weekly debates. Ever since Keith wrote his review last month, I have received a steady stream of emails asking me what my take is. Why? I have no idea. I’m just cigar-crazed goofball with spiky hair. But here goes!

First off, let’s talk looks. La Herencia is a blend of Nicaraguan long-fillers inside a Sumatra-seed wrapper grown in Ecuador. Like most Ecuadorian wrappers, this leaf is smooth and oily. However, it maintains the dark hue and almost-leathery trait of a good Sumatra. The cigar really is quite pretty and gives off a nice pre-light aroma.

Now, let’s get into the smoke itself. The opening is quite creamy, with a heavy dose of toast and wood. Every now and then some hefty spices enter the fray, but they are quickly diminished by the smooth, lingering aftertaste. After about an inch, the flavors seem to mellow a bit, but the strength does quite the opposite. Ahh....welcome to Nicaragua, please enjoy your stay. The flavors are balanced, but rich, releasing a deep, aromatic smoke with some body behind every puff. The smoke coats my palate, leaving behind the slightest tingling sensation. The toast and wood remain, but I am now picking up a trace of coffee bean. The smoke is all over me, with a zesty, cedary element. The peppery aspect of this cigar is beginning to build with each puff as the cigar approaches the midway point.

I’ll be honest with you. My head is starting to swim a bit. I’ve burned through enough of these to know it’s medium to full in body. However, every now and then one really seems to kick me in the knees early on.

The cigar ends in a big way, with all the flavors (except the coffee) fighting for supremacy. Quite a nice ending for such a subtle, yet sophisticated cigar. Now that it's done, here's my take: it's not the best cigar on the planet, but I have to agree with the majority here, and I'll continue burning them.

While reviewing this cigar, I thought about the love-hate relationship people seem to have for it. And believe me, these types of relationships occur with many brands, even some of today’s best. I think there are many times when enthusiasts give up on a cigar after just a few minutes, not knowing how the cigar might change in both flavor and strength during the burn. While the first inch might be boring, the final 4 or 5 inches might be fantastic....but, some people might not last long enough to get there. Worst part is, many won’t give the cigar another chance after chucking the first out the car window. One, stop littering. Two, give cigars a chance, you might be surprised!