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Reviews by Brock

Showing 1-5 of 21 Reviews Back To Staff Reviews

Tabacalera Zapata

Posted , by Brock
88

Roughly five years ago, my hair was longer, face was cleaner and midsection was smaller. Moreover, I couldn’t refer to myself as a cigar connoisseur or aficionado, but rather, a cigar groupie. I was fascinated by anyone who worked in this great industry and it didn’t matter if it was a cigar maker, rep, roller or anybody else who does this for a living. Hell, the ....

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Plasencia Reserva 1898

Posted , by Brock
90

Years back, I had the privilege to travel to Central America with a purchaser of ours in hopes of negotiating deals, working on new blends and overall prove my worth to the company. Why the powers that be here at CI allowed me to do this, I sure as hell don’t know. But what I do know is that it was one of the most memorable experiences in my life.  While I’m ....

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Gurkha Beauty

Posted , by Brock
90

There’s a lovely young lady that stops by the CI Super-Store from time to time and, for the sake of anonymity, let us refer to her as “Lola”. Lola is an avid Gurkha fan and has a way of pushing the brand on me (keep in mind, I’M the cigar salesperson and she’s the customer!) Days ago, she graced us with her presence at the shop and, while it’s ....

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CI Knock-Offs: Cohiba

Posted , by Brock
92

“Pequeno” in size, “Grande” in flavor… For those who pay attention to detail, I whipped up this review the day after CIGARfest 2012, still jacked up from the weekend’s festivities. As we wrapped up the CIGARfest 2012 aftermath, I was embarrassed, humiliated, and appalled at the fact that I didn’t smoke many cigars. Between drawing ....

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Estd. 1844

Posted , by Brock
88

Estd. 1844 Anejado No. 50 During the year of 1844, several historical events had occurred: The Dominican Republic had declared their independence from Haiti and drafted their first constitution, the US ship USS Princeton exploded on the Potomac River killing numerous passengers, including two U.S. cabinet members, and Mr. Samuel Morse sent the very first electrical telegram from ....

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